About 16 results found.
  • The second assumption is that acting in complex, uncertain, and ambiguous management situations involves "modeling to understand..." (Le Moigne, 2003). A project manager should develop his or her own set of models for analysis.In this article, the PMJ editor defines "model" and develops a categorization, classification, and taxonomy of models. Furthermore, the reader is encouraged to focus on "modeling to understand that is to do ingeniously!"
  • In this article, financial concepts are applied in the project portfolio and then cash flow at risk, as a measure in project portfolio optimization is developed. Finally, we propose a novel mathematical model for project selection.Project portfolio management deals with the selection of multiple projects. Because the number of potential projects that can be selected is greater than the number of projects that can be funded, managers face the problem of selecting a portfolio that maximizes the expected benefits.
  • Over the past two decades, the proliferation of technology and communication that continues to spread worldwide has helped foster a new global understanding of the complexity--the interdependency--of organizational communities. This paper examines how a proposed model for managing project complexity can help project managers integrate and control the myriad of organizational alliances and partnerships that are involved in realizing projects.
  • This paper presents a study of complex society and its relationship to project management.Complex society is characterized by open systems, chaos, self-organization and interdependence.Accelerated change drives instability and chaos following an autocatalytic process.The conventional project management approach assumes a world of order and a predictable environment in which one can set and deliver a clear set of goals in a defined manner.The traditional approach is open to challenge.The author argues that a paradigm shift in project management is essential for it to be relevant and effective in a complex society of this century.Research is needed to further define a fresh understanding of project management and how it can respond to the challenges of a complex society.This necessitates working globally to advance the field. This paper presents a study of complex society and its relationship to project management.Complex society is characterized by open systems, chaos, self-organization and interdependence.Accelerated change drives instability and chaos following an autocatalytic process.The conventional project management approach assumes a world of order and a predictable environment in which one can set and deliver a clear set of goals in a defined manner.The traditional approach is open to challenge.The author argues that a paradigm shift in project management is essential for it to be relevant and effective in a complex society of this century.Research is needed to further define a fresh understanding of project management and how it can respond to the challenges of a complex society.This necessitates working globally to advance the field.
  • This paper describes the Dynamic Baseline Model (R) (DBM) as a framework for analysis of the project management learning process and an indicator of the expected success of a project. By matching project complexity with the appropriate project management approach, the DBM identifies individual learning needs and the appropriate response to the challenges of todays projects. By matching project complexity with the appropriate project management approach, the DBM identifies individual learning needs and the appropriate response to the challenges of todays projects. As project management tools and techniques are more and more applied as a one-size-fits-all solution, there is a need to explore beyond these tools and techniques.
  • This paper demystifies program management by offering a competency model for program managers that is focused on identifying and dealing with program complexity. It describes the six performances and eight personal competencies research by the authors, which have been shown to be critical to success for a program manager working on large and complex initiatives.
  • It provides a tool for further investigation into program assessment. The paper also includes a literature review that starts with the success school of project management as it provides the theoretical perspective for the study.
  • A range of theories (actor-network theory, multimodality, and sense making) are drawn together into a single model of project management processes in order to discuss project success and failure. It is argued that success and failure can be characterized in terms of a continuum between project convergence and divergence. This article suggests that a combination of these ideas can provide a richer picture of the operation of complex projects. It is suggested that different actors have to be enrolled (or translated) into the project network, but that this only results in genuine convergence when sense making between those actors is brought into alignment.
  • But scheduling is not, and definitely should not be, a finite practice. As organizations begin to mature and develop deeper and broader project management practices into a more enterprise project management (EPM) framework, scheduling must mature as well. This paper will address the growth of scheduling within a maturing organization through alignment within a project portfolio management (PPM) maturity model. Scheduling is often seen as the beginning, and almost the finest deliverable, of project management practices within an organization. But scheduling is not, and definitely should not be, a finite practice.
  • To manage the three types of business functions (strategy, operations, and projects), management professionals must possess a process for ensuring that their staff accomplishes their function's intended objectives. This paper examines how one organization implemented a three-level, theory-of-constraints-based planning process--known as proactive and robust objectives management (PROM)--to ensure that its managers aligned and updated their function's tactical and strategic objectives.
 
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