About 316 results found.
  • The article then cautions that project managers cannot lose sight of one all-important factor when deciding to fast-track a project: reality. Accompanying the article is a sidebar discussing situations when fast-tracking does not apply.From construction to IT, fast-tracking--running project steps concurrently or overlapping to save time--is a tempting choice when a project swerves off schedule, a sponsor moves the delivery date or an organization wants to beat a competitor to market.
  • Learning lessons from the 2014 World Cup, as the city of Rio de Janiero gears up for the 2016 Summer Olympic Games, project managers are looking to fast-track construction schedules to make up for delays in time and cost increases.
  • Aggressive scheduling, or strong forms of fast-tracking, for construction projects is becoming increasingly common in project management because of tight schedules, tight budgets, and client desires to commence operations quickly. In this study, three hypotheses are tested to better understand the impact of aggressive scheduling and to quantify the cost of changes resulting during the total construction and design phases. Using data from 108 construction projects, this study found that high levels of fast-tracking generally do not result in any more change than nonfast-tracked projects. This paper also presents a variety of graphical relationships, including curves for the amount of change and its timing during the project's schedule.
  • For example, a project team member may overestimate the task duration and not work under pressure, a project manager may compress time, and a business owner may shorten time to get revenue faster. Compressing time is important for all stakeholders; fast tracking and crashing are usually used for this purpose. Some people think of these two techniques as magic words, because once they are applied the schedule magically will be cut in half or by a third. This paper discusses how using these techniques too often may lead to an explosion and identifies what each party should do avoid this explosion. In doing so, it explains the FasTraCra schedule (compressed too much using fast tracking and crashing). It then identifies warning signs when compressing a project. It overviews six occurrences when a proje
  • New project management techniques are required for very complex, high-tech, quality-driven and time-sensitive projects. Construction of a mega yacht is a good example of such project. New approaches to project management techniques are developing to help keep ...
  • By the end of this course, you will be able to:•identify inputs to the Control Schedule process•recognize tools and techniques used to control the schedule•perform earned value management calculations to assess a project's schedule performance•recognize examples of the outputs of the Control Schedule process•recognize if resource leveling is the ideal resource optimization technique, given a scenario•recognize if resource smoothing is the ideal resource optimization technique, given a scenario•recognize if crashing is the most appropriate schedule compression technique, given a scenario•recognize if fast tracking is the most appropriate schedule compression technique, given a scenario•demonstrate your understanding of the Control Schedule process
  • It then explains how one company used this process to establish a PMO. It identifies the steps this company implemented and the challenges—project tracking, status reporting, employee training—it resolved. It also lists the benefits it achieved from operating a PMO.
  • So far as I can determine, these words are the only words in boldface type in the Final Report of the Inquiry Commissioner: The three practices -- fast-tracking, bidding for professional services and fragmentation... cause me a great deal of concern.
  • Although fast-track scheduling is not a new process for managing projects, it is one that may have the most potential to significantly improve the outcome of large construction projects, especially those efforts involving multi-year efforts, such as the building of new hospitals. Although fast-track scheduling is not a new process for managing projects, it is one that may have the most potential to significantly improve the outcome of large construction projects, especially those efforts involving multi-year efforts, such as the building of new hospitals. This article explains the process for implementing fast-track scheduling and discusses the results achieved by the construction team who used this approach to construct McMaster University's (Ontario, Canada) health sciences center.
  • When schedules change during the project execution phase, practitioners must choose whether to crash or fast-track the schedule. In "Pressed for time," project managers discuss scenarios that exemplify each of these time-saving techniques.
 
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